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On the subject of traditional kilt-wearing theory

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KT

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On the subject of traditionbe_strong_not_pressed.jpgal kilt-wearing theory.

At the Brotherhood of the Kilt we accept ALL kilt-loving folks.  While tradition says kilts should be worn a specific way, I will NOT stand for people belittling, disparaging or otherwise maligning other people here, members or not, regarding how they wear the kilt.   We are NOT the Kilt police.  

 

I do encourage active discussions on different ways to wear the kilt, and suggestions for formal or semi-formal wear "corrections" but claiming anyone is more or less manly based on the cut or wear of their kilt is simply ridiculous.

To those who dedicate their lives in trying to enforce traditional kilt wearing method, I ask this.

 

Why are you not going after anyone wearing blue jeans if they are not some kind of factory worker, cowboy or miner?  That is why blue jeans exists in their original version, loose and for workers.

The evolution of the Blue Jeans as fashion staple vs. work clothes has a decent article on wikipedia, I suggest anyone who is going to get all pissy about someone wearing a kilt a little different read that, as I firmly believe the kilt is going through a similar process of changing from a limited-use garment by specific people to generally accepted clothing for the masses.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jeans

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Undeniable. Utility and sports kilts have truly change the concepts of kilt wear. Thompson's original "So you're going to wear a kilt" was written long before utility kilts and politely encourages traditional wear of kilts and accessories. With utility and sports kilts the concepts are evolving. Living things change and for the kilt to live on as a practical garment choice the concepts of appropriate wear must change too or it will become just a museum piece.

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Although I wear my kilts in a "traditionally accepted" manner, I recognize that kilts are garments.

As such, how they are worn is up to the discretion of the wearer (as long as they are not donned backwards;))

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Quite right, as I published on my own blog last week also. And as we all know, Kevin has been saying this for years and years. 

 

I think the reason for the obsession some people (ex-pat Scots included) for how to wear the kilt is a hangover from when the civilian kilt was militarised in 1746. When the Dress Act was repealed in 1782, the only people who had legally worn them for the previous 36 years were soldiers and officers of the highland regiments. So when it was an article of uniform, it would have been subject to the same level of detailed regulation as the red coat, boots, wigs, packs, and every other item of military attire. Of course, after 1782, the army continued to wear kilts, prolonging the confusion between an article of uniform, and an article of civilian dress, which is not subject to regulation. My impression is that when the act was repealed, that there was a sense of "civilianising" an item of military uniform, rather than reversing the previous militarisation of a longstanding item of civilian attire. So the baggage of how to wear it as a uniform accompanied its later use. I still see people from Scotland argue (in the ceaseless underpants debate) "When I was in the army we had dress inspections with a mirror, and anyone caught wearing underpants..." Well I have news for him: most men are not in the army and I haven't been in the army for some time. Putting a kilt on is not the same as wearing chest webbing or a military hat in public.

 

https://swingfreeforcancer.org/2016/10/27/kilt-cops-tartan-nazis-and-the-need-or-not-to-be-scottish/

 

An answer I have started giving to kilt cops around the place, is "My kilt is not a military kilt, it's a civilian one, just like the clothes you're wearing. The army has shirts and troo$er$, but you don't adhere to Army Standing Orders for Dress in how you iron them, or what kind of belt you wear, and neither to I.

 

As Kevin says, "My kilt, my rules."

 

p.s. the text editor keeps changing the word troo$er$ and p@nt$ to a bunch of punctuation marks. No idea why.

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