Chris Webb

Brother for Life
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Chris Webb last won the day on June 13 2016

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About Chris Webb

  • Rank
    Lifetime Member of the Brotherhood
  • Birthday 11/07/1960

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Burleson, Texas
  • Gender
    Male

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  1. I need to get a photo for your guys. My go to kilt these days is actually made out of a BDU jacket (Cold War Era Army Uniform). I LOVE it. It's not a kilt in the purest form, but the pleats ARE in the back!! LOL! It buttons down the front, though ... after all, it's made out of a shirt. Kilt ON!
  2. I'm Chris Webb, likely the guy with the broadest definition of a kilt in the Brotherhood. LOL! Before the Brotherhood of the Kilt I was the top poster at the Braveheart's Kilt Forum. I'm also the only kiltman with the honor of having been banned from Xmarksthescot TWICE!! KT recruited me into the BotK and, though I've not been around much of late, it became a sort of church for me. I became a Lifetime Member of the Brotherhood in my first year here, in fact in the first year the BotK existed. Many of you use versions of the phrase, "Kilt ON!" I coined it as my sign off at the Braveheart's Kilt Forum before the BotK was formed. It still warms my heart when I see new Kiltmen embracing the freedom of expression, freedom of movement, sense of belonging and celebration of their masculinity that donning a kilt brings. The phrase harkens back to when wearing a kilt as a daily thing, wearing one to work, defying family and friends, defying society and conventional norms was rare and challenging. When I coined it the phrase meant to push through, to defy the opposition, to refuse troo$er$ ... what a cool thing to have seen it become a phrase of excitement and confidence. Kilt ON! Kilt ON!! Much has changed in kilting since I went full time in 2003. The War on the Tyranny of troo$er$ has been won. Kilt makers in the USA have flourished. The sight of a fellow kiltman has gone from once a year or so to once a week, at least here in Fort Worth, Texas. Shoot, I even stood in line at the grocery store with 2 other guys in kilts I'd never met. Wow, how things have changed. And all three of us were unique in how we wore our kilts, even what we considered a kilt. Oh, how we Americans have taken this Scottish garment and made it our own. We have taken the best of it, mixed it with best of us and made it ours too. I had one kilt, it was knee length, Stuart Royal tartan ... but I've lost count now. They were hard to get back then. Easy to get now. Tartan, cammo, Carheart, denim, solid, utility, tactical, hiking, rockabilly, steam punk, bellow the knee, above the knee, even above the thigh! And I will say with deep conviction and appreciations that it has been KT who shepherded American Kilting to the level of acceptance and celebration that we enjoy today. He has been the keel and the rudder of our ship. He pushed kilting into the mainstream like no other. From the BotK to the biggest kilt in the world to writing the most profound and enjoyable book on kilting ... to sacrificing for us all ... his time, his emotions, his intelligence, his finances ... and for the BotK, his commitment, his leadership. There would be no BotK with out him. The BotK survived turmoil, internal conflict, external attack all because he believed in it, in us. Who am I? As I ponder the question I realize that it really all boils down to this ... I am a kiltman. Kilt ON! Chris Webb
  3. As a survivor of severe clinical depression I completely understand why he did it ... but it is impossible to explain it to anyone who hasn't been there themselves. Nobody who is depressed 'decides' to commit suicide ... they are compelled to ... and it can be unstoppable. It's cool that he was a kiltman, I had no idea. Kilt ON! Chris Webb
  4. How about a link to your Facebook page ... I will LIKE it!
  5. I understand! I began this project in 2003 if you go all the way back to when I first started developing The Gittite Way. Shoot, it was my oldest daughter that nearly MADE me write the book before I turned 50. I had NO idea it would take 3 years after that to edit it, well, edit it some more, have other people edit it, then the designer to massage it, then the next ebook architect to create it ... then the last 3 edits and I STILL found a misspelled word after it was published. I'm off tomorrow because of all the rain and will spend most of the day working on promoting it with my distributor. Yep, I have a whole new respect for 'Authors'.
  6. Shoot, I'm your neighbor. Greetings from Burleson, Texas. Kilt ON!
  7. My all encompassing project has finally been completed and The Gittite Way has been published ... I have experienced first hand why published authors so often take such pride in it. LOL MAN, that took a lot of work. Anyway, Brothers and Sisters, here's a link should you take an interest in what one of your own came up with as a better way to live. Kilt ON! Chris Webb http://www.amazon.com/Gittite-Way-Love-Others-Judge-ebook/dp/B00KSDAA9U/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1402448852&sr=8-1&keywords=the+gittite+way
  8. I knew there was a reason I haven't been around here much. No Megs!
  9. I've been wearing them constantly for 10 years. I LOVE them. However, except for their solid black kilt, all the specialty fabric kilts I've got just won't hold a pleat and have to be ironed really, really well after every single wash ... or even extended wear. They do a little better if you gut the hem off of them and let them fray a bit. I have some of the Army Digital Cammo kilts for summer work kilts ... they are cooler to wear, but very frustrating to manage, pleat wise because I have to constantly smooth them out. Kilt ON! PS Their hiking kilts are light and airy, but you have to get them without the pleats being sewn down or the kilt will be VERY hot around your midsection. The hiking kilt material doesn't breath at all and gets really stiff if it gets wet and dirty.
  10. Ah, the irony of our changing times. LOL! I remember well when the thought of a female kilt brought out egregious tirades from many a kiltman! Such is the effect of the rule of unintended consequences. We've made kilts (and skirts, frankly) socially acceptable for men partly on the basis that men should be able to wear skirts if women can wear p@nt$. Soooo women can wear kilts if men can wear kilts. I'm not complaining. I LOVE a gal in one of those SportKilt micro kilts. OH yea. Kilt ON!
  11. My heart goes out to you and yours, if you know what I mean. LOL!
  12. I've got two solid black kilts and I LOVE them. I'd wear a solid red kilt for sure ... but, like you, I've never seen one and have no idea where to get one.
  13. Thanks for the encouraging words, Brothers, I deeply appreciate all of them. Kilt ON!
  14. I went over 10 years kilting full time last week. My first kilt was a Scottish Traditional Kilt from a Ren Fair. Then I discovered SportKilt and branched off into not just Tartan Kilts, but solids and cammos ... then even different lengths. As the years rolled by I began to experiment with male un-bifurcated garments of all varieties, exploring which kinds of manskirts worked best for virtually all of life's activities. I wonder if my experience is similar to others ... I think it must be because of one single observation about the kilt community: folks are not nearly as wrapped up in what makes a proper kilt now as they used to be. Society in general has taken to calling any skirt worn on a man a kilt. I think that anybody who has stuck to kilts full time has learned to deviate from the Scottish Traditional in favor of the Modern Practical. Over 3,650 days in a row ... last week my Mom said, "10 years ago we all thought it was just a phase." But what nobody knew is that I'd wanted to wear un-bifurcated garments since I was a little kid, ever since I stared at the Indians on the corners of our Wahoo board and wanted to be one of them. Today I am as free as one of them ... even free of the confines of kilts, free to wear any and every kind of skirt I want to wear. I am a man without p@nt$. It is who I truly am. It is who I always wanted to be. Kilt ON! Chris Webb