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Barley Bird

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i love that canvas material. one more kilt on my list :P

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My god, the price is fantastic, and I don't give a ding dang doo about wrinkles...

I might just have to order 8 yards of that to make a coat I have my eye on. A brown coat.

Excellent link, thank you thank you thank you.

Must order some just to see how the quality is, I predict some good kilts could be made from that.

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Also, if the canvas is a dense enough weave, that might be a good candidate to rub down with Driza Bone and make an oilcloth kilt.

Which would be feckin' awesome.

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ooooooooo oilcloth kilt....... :drool:

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Looking at that site has me drooling over all sorts of wacky kilt ideas.... And their prices are out of this world.

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ooooooooo oilcloth kilt....... :drool:

I've had plans to do an oilcloth kilt for a long, long time. It has been discussed on this board, and even Xmarks, more than a few times.

It is quite a bit of work. And there are steps to how to do it.

But it would be an awesome kilt. Can't do it with a poly blend, it has to be a very dense cotton canvas.

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*writes down* oil....cloth....kilt...

thats another one down.

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I haven't solved how I am going to get the chalk marks off of an oil cloth kilt after I finish sewing it.

Or how I'll even get chalk marks ON an oilcloth kilt. Before doing anything to the fabric, before one stitch is laid, you have to treat it. And treat it again. And treat it some more. But not to much, just enough to make it slightly oily so you can sew a good seam on it.

After you finish constructing the garment, you apply many more coats of something like Driza Bone, saturating every nook and cranny.

Eventually, the chalk would become part of the patina I think. You treat oilcloth like you do cast iron. You really don't wash it unless you absolutely have to, and you just keep applying the oil mix to the fabric. A well aged patina on oilcloth is beautiful on a coat, would look great on a kilt.

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I've done some reading... There are some newish formulated stuff out there now where you can take a sewn garment, heat up the goop to a runny liquid, and soak the garment after creation, making sure to saturate the fabric. It is still an involved and time consuming process, as this takes many many layers.

So it would be possible to chalk out a kilt, sew it together, wash it, and then GOOP it.

Working with hot goop is bad though, burns are common, and it doesn't smell good.

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