Just how Celtic are you?  

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Last name is Smith but it appears to be English smith on my fathers side but just about every branch on my mothers side is Scottish/Irish. Ties to Stewart, Smith (Scottish Smith) Thistle. thats just a few she has mentioned I'd need to find the geneology paperwork to get all the names.

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OK... now this is a wonderful post. It really gets you to thinking. I like the fact that it gets an individual to not only think "am I Scottish..." but, possibly on thought of "heck am I Gaelic : Scottish\Irish\Welsh". It just gets one to that point of curiosity where they are interested in where they have come from (no matter where that may be).

As far as bloodline and where a person (man\woman) might stand in relation to ANY type of Gaelic heritage... here is how I see it (and trust me, this is coming from a first generation, full "blue" blood... to use the term loosely... and yes, I AM a true titled Scotsman. I have the patence, and the paperwork, that proves such )...

1) You are here because you love the kilt and everything it stands for.

2) You just plain love the way the style of the kilt looks

3) because of #'s 1 and 2... it has caused you to grab hold of someplace where you feel you belong, or are understood

4) because of #1... you are interested in Gaelic heritage and what that means

5) because of #1... you are interest in YOUR Gaelic heritage and what that means

6) All of the above

This website (which was started and is run by a REALLY great friend of mine) is dedicate to the kilt, wearing the kilt, and the statement made by wearing the same (whether a statement of heritage or a statement of uniqueness). I find you all, because of that distinction\choice, to be more a part of MY heritage (Scottish) than a lot that are born in "heaven"\Scotland (lol). I know and I have seen a lot of Scots\Gaelic that could care less who or what they are. IMHO... it's those, like you all, that hold the passion close to your heart... that will keep the definition of what it means to be Gaelic alive for the next generation and generations to come.

It truly thrills my heart to see\read the responses of what each individual has written within this post (and most of those honestly state... "I'm not", or "I never thought I was until..."). Heritage and who\what makes us who we are... is VERY important. I love the diversity I see here. You all are the epitome of what our future will be. And that makes me proud. Proud of who and what I am, proud that I am apart of this, and proud that I can share this place with all of you. Slante Vo...

Yours Aye,

Lord S. M. McClain

President - Seven Rivers Highland Society

Lord McClain - of the Ulster McClain

:yes:

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OK... now this is a wonderful post. It really gets you to thinking. I like the fact that it gets an individual to not only think "am I Scottish..." but, possibly on thought of "heck am I Gaelic : Scottish\Irish\Welsh". It just gets one to that point of curiosity where they are interested in where they have come from (no matter where that may be).

As far as bloodline and where a person (man\woman) might stand in relation to ANY type of Gaelic heritage... here is how I see it (and trust me, this is coming from a first generation, full "blue" blood... to use the term loosely... and yes, I AM a true titled Scotsman. I have the patence, and the paperwork, that proves such )...

1) You are here because you love the kilt and everything it stands for.

2) You just plain love the way the style of the kilt looks

3) because of #'s 1 and 2... it has caused you to grab hold of someplace where you feel you belong, or are understood

4) because of #1... you are interested in Gaelic heritage and what that means

5) because of #1... you are interest in YOUR Gaelic heritage and what that means

6) All of the above

This website (which was started and is run by a REALLY great friend of mine) is dedicate to the kilt, wearing the kilt, and the statement made by wearing the same (whether a statement of heritage or a statement of uniqueness). I find you all, because of that distinction\choice, to be more a part of MY heritage (Scottish) than a lot that are born in "heaven"\Scotland (lol). I know and I have seen a lot of Scots\Gaelic that could care less who or what they are. IMHO... it's those, like you all, that hold the passion close to your heart... that will keep the definition of what it means to be Gaelic alive for the next generation and generations to come.

It truly thrills my heart to see\read the responses of what each individual has written within this post (and most of those honestly state... "I'm not", or "I never thought I was until..."). Heritage and who\what makes us who we are... is VERY important. I love the diversity I see here. You all are the epitome of what our future will be. And that makes me proud. Proud of who and what I am, proud that I am apart of this, and proud that I can share this place with all of you. Slante Vo...

Yours Aye,

Lord S. M. McClain

President - Seven Rivers Highland Society

Lord McClain - of the Ulster McClain

:yes:

The man speaks volumes doesn't he...

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Well My mothers side is Scottish and my fathers side Irish. 3 out of my 4 Grandparents were Gaelic speakers. The 4th learned English in later life about 35 years old. My connection is rather tentative then. Lol

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^^ that is indeed a very good point.

just like the fact that not all Scots spoke Gaelic, not all Scots Scots are/were of Celtic descent. in fact there's an argument that the Picts were not Celtic at all.

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^^ that is indeed a very good point.

just like the fact that not all Scots spoke Gaelic, not all Scots Scots are/were of Celtic descent. in fact there's an argument that the Picts were not Celtic at all.

That's a strange argument I've never heard. Got more info?

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it was actually on a BBC programme that i first heard the theory. don't ask me which one as i can't remember. but it doesn't take long on google to find the same argument...

Who were the Picts? Well, if you were looking for an area that is full of controversy this is it! This is in no way a comprehensive picture but an outline of one or two theories of the origins of the Picts. I will however be going into more detail of the Picts and the various areas mentioned here in future articles.

There is no doubt that the whole subject of their origins is misted in Fables, Legend, Fabrication and a severe lack of historical and archaeological information. Were they Celtic, Iberian, Scandinavian etc? I think to try and make sense of it all we must first go back to go forward, to a time not long after the ice age and Scotlands hunter-gatherer Mesolithic past (8000 –4000 BC).

These Iberian hunter –gatherers moved through France and lower Britain to enter Scotland around 7000BC. Remains of their campsites are rare, Morton in Fife and another on the River Lussa being two examples. At Lussa the camp contained stone rings approximately 1.5m in diameter and may be the oldest stone structures in Scotland. The West of Scotland Islands give a further reinforcement to the movement of these Mesolithic people by the finds of large shell mounds and various tools such as fish hooks and harpoons but as I said Artefacts of the period are scarce.

A slow transition took place for these Mesolithic people and by (4000 – 2500 BC) they moved into a Neolithic farming life. Many other things must be taken into consideration at this time too like the introduction of new flint and stone tools, pottery, permanent settlements, new religious beliefs and Tombs and ‘Temples’. These structured Tombs were round barrows called Cairns in the East, like Calva Cairn while in the West and North the Chambered tomb such as Maes How in Orkney was preferred and these Tombs are probably the best supplier of artefacts of this time. There is very Little evidence of the settlements but probably the best known is that of Skara Brae in Orkney which remained virtually intact due to being covered for many centuries. Other Neolithic monuments in Scotland include henges and stone circles. Henges are widely spread across the country including two in Orkney - the Ring of Brogar and the Stones of Stenness. A henge is a banked and ditched enclosure, there is a central platform enclosed by a deep ditch, the ditch material is then thrown onto the outer edge to form a bank around the whole.

(2500 – 700 BC) sees the entrance of the Beaker People from Northern and Central Europe and the start of Scotland’s Bronze Age. The beaker people are known by this name for the cremated remains of their dead being cremated and buried in pots and interred in single graves, unlike the Neolithic people who buried their dead in groups. It is also recognised that the beaker people were the ones to introduce metalwork to Scotland. There is no record of any conflicts between the two peoples in Scotland although their lifestyles were in many ways so different and it is the bonding of these two peoples into various tribes (who for unknown reasons seemed to be forever pushed northwards). That leads to the theory that the Picts were an aboriginal race and non-Celtic. The difference in language must also be taken into consideration with this theory, as it is believed that the Picts did not speak with a Celtic tongue.

The second theory of the Picts is that their origins were Celtic. Believers in this describe the two branches as Q-Celts and P-Celts. Both origins were that of Indo-European qu being Q-Celtic and the other transforming the qu into p became P-Celtic. Examples given of this are Q-Celtic were Goedelic languages such as Irish, Scottish, Gaelic and Manx and the P-Celtic were Gaulish and Brittonic that of British, Welsh, Cornish and Breton.

bolding is my own. the text comes from http://www.scotshistoryonline.co.uk/origin1.html

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OK... now this is a wonderful post. It really gets you to thinking. I like the fact that it gets an individual to not only think "am I Scottish..." but, possibly on thought of "heck am I Gaelic : Scottish\Irish\Welsh". It just gets one to that point of curiosity where they are interested in where they have come from (no matter where that may be).

As far as bloodline and where a person (man\woman) might stand in relation to ANY type of Gaelic heritage... here is how I see it (and trust me, this is coming from a first generation, full "blue" blood... to use the term loosely... and yes, I AM a true titled Scotsman. I have the patence, and the paperwork, that proves such )...

1) You are here because you love the kilt and everything it stands for.

2) You just plain love the way the style of the kilt looks

3) because of #'s 1 and 2... it has caused you to grab hold of someplace where you feel you belong, or are understood

4) because of #1... you are interested in Gaelic heritage and what that means

5) because of #1... you are interest in YOUR Gaelic heritage and what that means

6) All of the above

This website (which was started and is run by a REALLY great friend of mine) is dedicate to the kilt, wearing the kilt, and the statement made by wearing the same (whether a statement of heritage or a statement of uniqueness). I find you all, because of that distinction\choice, to be more a part of MY heritage (Scottish) than a lot that are born in "heaven"\Scotland (lol). I know and I have seen a lot of Scots\Gaelic that could care less who or what they are. IMHO... it's those, like you all, that hold the passion close to your heart... that will keep the definition of what it means to be Gaelic alive for the next generation and generations to come.

It truly thrills my heart to see\read the responses of what each individual has written within this post (and most of those honestly state... "I'm not", or "I never thought I was until..."). Heritage and who\what makes us who we are... is VERY important. I love the diversity I see here. You all are the epitome of what our future will be. And that makes me proud. Proud of who and what I am, proud that I am apart of this, and proud that I can share this place with all of you. Slante Vo...

Yours Aye,

Lord S. M. McClain

President - Seven Rivers Highland Society

Lord McClain - of the Ulster McClain

Me personally, I'm Slovak, Polish & French, but since my involvement with the Boy Scouts of America and advanced leader training called Wood Badge I was able to join the Clan MacLaren as an associate member. I wear a kilt (MacLaren modern) with my scout leader uniform as does my son in his boy scout uniform (in fact he wore it to school today, he went as a highlander, he's in the 7th grade). My wife is a member of the Clan McClain and wears their tartan.

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Ripped from a different thread.

How many people on this board have No to very very little Scottish / Celtic blood in them.

I do not believe I do.

Yet I wear kilts anyways. Almost full time to.

I'm Danish by heritage, however I have Scotsmen in my family---long story...

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<!--quoteo(post=161072:date=May 7 2009, 10:31 AM:name=Kilted Eric)--><div class='quotetop'>QUOTE (Kilted Eric @ May 7 2009, 10:31 AM) <a href="index.php?act=findpost&pid=161072"><{POST_SNAPBACK}></a></div><div class='quotemain'><!--quotec-->Ripped from a different thread.

How many people on this board have No to very very little Scottish / Celtic blood in them.

I do not believe I do.

Yet I wear kilts anyways. Almost full time to.<!--QuoteEnd--></div><!--QuoteEEnd-->

I'm Danish by heritage, however I have Scotsmen in my family---long story...

The celts wore troo$er$, they did not wear kilts. Kilts were dveloped in the 16th century Scottish highlands.

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The celts wore troo$er$, they did not wear kilts. Kilts were dveloped in the 16th century Scottish highlands.

note to all: this "peepingTom" is a troll that continues to break all the rules and get himself banned. he has nothing better to do in life than to find new IP addresses and email addresses to create new accounts to get himself banned repeatedly.

it should also be noted that his statement of history is incorrect.

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No Celtic blood here. Only German or if you go back far enough on my mother's side, Swiss.

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note to all: this "peepingTom" is a troll that continues to break all the rules and get himself banned. he has nothing better to do in life than to find new IP addresses and email addresses to create new accounts to get himself banned repeatedly.

it should also be noted that his statement of history is incorrect.

Actually it is not incorrect. How on earth can you sit and tell me that the celts wore kilts. They did not. they were very widely documented as wearing troo$er$. Kilts were not worn before the 16th century.

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Actually it is not incorrect. How on earth can you sit and tell me that the celts wore kilts. They did not. they were very widely documented as wearing troo$er$. Kilts were not worn before the 16th century.

he's back again. and as expected...banned.

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My Grandmother McCracken was off the boat from Scotland but through investigation it turns out her mother was Scot her father was An Irish McCracken and up his Family line his Great grand uncle is Henry Joy McCracken of United Irish rebellion fame. His grandfather on his mothers side is Francis Joy the founder of the Belfast News-letter. The rest of my ancestry all leads to Scotland, Wales, England, and Ireland. Mostly Scotland and Ireland.

The News Letter – the oldest continuously published daily newspaper in the English-speaking world Belfast Newsletter

Edited to add info

Edited by Michael Moore
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I have no idea. I was an accident, my father was a Fulton my dad (married my mom and later adopted me) was a Gladwell.

I'm a mutt with no history.

"MacNobody" fits well.

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On my biological father's side my great grandmother and great great grandmother were both from Cornwall. Great great grandma had Solomon as a maiden name and great grandmother's maiden name was Kelly so there may be some Irish in there too. Great great grandfather was of German descent. The surname is Broemer which is suppose to be German Celtic for swamp dweller or berry picker. I've only found one source for the meaning behind the Broemer name so its still up in the air. My step dad is suppose to have some English blood in him and he thinks some how that his mom was somehow related to the Queen.

Mom is Italian and swears that there is no way I could be anything but Italian. :wink:

Edited by Rob Soderman

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My mother's mother was a MacQueen. As for the rest, it's a mix of English, German, and what not. Most of my ancestors I can trace back to around 1800 up and down the eastern seaboard. MacQueen I can trace back to a John D. McQuien who married Sarah McMullen in Cumberland County, North Carolina, on 29 September 1814.

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I have some Scots/Irish blood from my fathers side and some English from my mothers.... I hate myself lol. When people ask if I'm scottish, or irish, I say "No, just comfortable."

and for the record, it's true that the kilt wasn't worn until the 16th century.... sorry if this bursts anyones bubble.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_kilt

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My Grandfather was a Paxton on my mothers side - the family has

stayed around York Penn. since early 1800's still trying to track down when

they arrived on the soil here Aaron Paxton lived from 1818 - 1886.

Seems that anyone connected through this lineage hits a brick wall

at aaron paxton.

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My Grandfather was a Paxton on my mothers side - the family has

stayed around York Penn. since early 1800's still trying to track down when

they arrived on the soil here Aaron Paxton lived from 1818 - 1886.

Seems that anyone connected through this lineage hits a brick wall

at aaron paxton.

It's tough when you get that far back. Census data isn't available. Tax and land records aren't available online. I'll have to start visiting the area they are from (or pay someone to do the research locally) to get any farther. It's frustrating especially if you have a common name like mine. Doubly so when you parents share the same last name! They met because my uncle and father were alphabetically queued up next to each other quite often while in the Marines. They got to talking, became friends, and my uncle introduced my mother to him while on leave.

Although, I admit I've had some fun with it. When I filled out my marriage license application and put down my mother's maiden name, the clerk got rather snotty with me (I imagine it's a common mistake and it's a tedious job.) She said "We need your mother's maiden name. You do know what it is don't you?" To which I replied, "Give me a break lady, they were cousins." Shut her right up.

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...and for the record, it's true that the kilt wasn't worn until the 16th century.... sorry if this bursts anyones bubble.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_kilt

Don't believe everything you read on Wikipedia, at least not at face value. The kilt wasn't called a kilt until the 16th century. ("Kilt" is not a Gaelic word, BTW.) The history of Celts wearing blanket-like garments goes back to Roman times, as described in several written Roman works including (Julius) Ceasar's Gaelic Wars. A bas-relief stone sculpture of Roman origin also illustrates a loose, belted, blanket-like Celtic garment. The Irish had a similar garment called the liene, and ironically, the Roman toga may have influenced the origins of the kilt.

What we now consider the kilt (tailored, pleated and waist-to-knee) didn't come along until circa 1725, and was possibly the invention of an Englishman, looking to improve the productivity of his Scottish tennants.

In short, there is no way to place an exact date on the first "kilt". It was a long evolutionary process.

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I just can't stand it when folks act like the Modern Scottish Traditional Kilt was the first and only Kilt there ever was or has been. There were precursors to the Modern Scottish Traditional Kilt and postcursors too. It ain't the only kilt, it ain't the first kilt and it ain't the last kilt. It is one kind of kilt occupying one period of time and now hanging on by a thread by the efforts of those who want to honor and celebrate that particular kind of kilt as part of their history and heritage.

Kilt ON!

Chris Webb

Oops, I just realized I might have been off topic. Both sides of my family are what we in Texas often call Black Dutch. Black Dutch is the term applied to those of mixed heritages including Scots-Irish, American Indian and/or African American. I'm about 7/8 Scottish and about 1/8 American Indian ... I say 'about' because I also have a smattering of African American from about 5 generations back.

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