Spartan

Celtic Anemia?

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This seems to be a place to put this topic, as it's related to Celtic ancestry. It could be off topic -- if so, mods, please move it.

Several years ago I was diagnosed with macrocytic anemia, aka pernicious anemia. The short of it is that my body no longer digests vitamin B-12 from the food that I ingest. Without B-12 the blood cells no longer carry sufficient oxygen, resulting in anemia and in the long term, permanent neurological damage. The treatment is B-12 injections and is 100% effective. I'm doing fine.

There is a hereditary factor. My brother also has low B-12 and is also receiving injections. Typically, the onset is after age 40, with 60 being the average.

Doing some research, I found a statement that macrocytic or pernicious anemia is prevalent among people with Celtic and/or Scandinavian ancestry. Prevalent, meaning that it shows up with a higher percentage among people with Celtic and Scandinavian ancestries than with people of other ethnic groups. It's still a small percentage of people, but not uncommon.

Since this forum probably has a large number of people with Celtic ancestry, (and a number of us who are in the age bracket) I am curious if there are others with this diagnosis.

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I think you may have hit on something. I don't (yet) have any signs, but my older sister does, and she also takes (I'm not sure how often) periodic shots.

She also participated in a trial of an inhaler a while back, but I don't know the results. When we talk (infrequently) we steer clear of health issues, because at our age everyone has enough problems to fill up any conversation. For instance, she doesn't yet know (and I may not tell her) that I had a bout with cancer.

So since I shared my problems with you guys and not her - - does that make this family closer? -Or do I have less of a regard for your sentimental health than I do for hers?

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Hmm interesting, & worth closer study. I find myself wondering about diabetes as well now, as that's prevalent in both my wife's & my families.

Mind, that may be due to a fondness for Lee's tablet... my favourite sweetie :)

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My mother is of Scandavanian/Irish/German descent and was very anemic for years! Never made the connection before.

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This seems to be a place to put this topic, as it's related to Celtic ancestry. It could be off topic -- if so, mods, please move it.

Several years ago I was diagnosed with macrocytic anemia, aka pernicious anemia. The short of it is that my body no longer digests vitamin B-12 from the food that I ingest. Without B-12 the blood cells no longer carry sufficient oxygen, resulting in anemia and in the long term, permanent neurological damage. The treatment is B-12 injections and is 100% effective. I'm doing fine.

There is a hereditary factor. My brother also has low B-12 and is also receiving injections. Typically, the onset is after age 40, with 60 being the average.

Doing some research, I found a statement that macrocytic or pernicious anemia is prevalent among people with Celtic and/or Scandinavian ancestry. Prevalent, meaning that it shows up with a higher percentage among people with Celtic and Scandinavian ancestries than with people of other ethnic groups. It's still a small percentage of people, but not uncommon.

Since this forum probably has a large number of people with Celtic ancestry, (and a number of us who are in the age bracket) I am curious if there are others with this diagnosis.

I was typing and about to back up and correct my spelling and reply disappeared??? As I was saying...all races and ethnic groups have their health issues. Celtic involves a huge population. Several "Celtic curses." Guess we have to take bitter with sweet! I'm glad you are doing well.

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This seems to be a place to put this topic, as it's related to Celtic ancestry. It could be off topic -- if so, mods, please move it.

Several years ago I was diagnosed with macrocytic anemia, aka pernicious anemia. The short of it is that my body no longer digests vitamin B-12 from the food that I ingest. Without B-12 the blood cells no longer carry sufficient oxygen, resulting in anemia and in the long term, permanent neurological damage. The treatment is B-12 injections and is 100% effective. I'm doing fine.

There is a hereditary factor. My brother also has low B-12 and is also receiving injections. Typically, the onset is after age 40, with 60 being the average.

Doing some research, I found a statement that macrocytic or pernicious anemia is prevalent among people with Celtic and/or Scandinavian ancestry. Prevalent, meaning that it shows up with a higher percentage among people with Celtic and Scandinavian ancestries than with people of other ethnic groups. It's still a small percentage of people, but not uncommon.

Since this forum probably has a large number of people with Celtic ancestry, (and a number of us who are in the age bracket) I am curious if there are others with this diagnosis.

I was typing and about to back up and correct my spelling and reply disappeared??? As I was saying...all races and ethnic groups have their health issues. Celtic involves a huge population. Several "Celtic curses." Guess we have to take bitter with sweet! I'm glad you are doing well.

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This seems to be a place to put this topic, as it's related to Celtic ancestry. It could be off topic -- if so, mods, please move it.

Several years ago I was diagnosed with macrocytic anemia, aka pernicious anemia. The short of it is that my body no longer digests vitamin B-12 from the food that I ingest. Without B-12 the blood cells no longer carry sufficient oxygen, resulting in anemia and in the long term, permanent neurological damage. The treatment is B-12 injections and is 100% effective. I'm doing fine.

There is a hereditary factor. My brother also has low B-12 and is also receiving injections. Typically, the onset is after age 40, with 60 being the average.

Doing some research, I found a statement that macrocytic or pernicious anemia is prevalent among people with Celtic and/or Scandinavian ancestry. Prevalent, meaning that it shows up with a higher percentage among people with Celtic and Scandinavian ancestries than with people of other ethnic groups. It's still a small percentage of people, but not uncommon.

Since this forum probably has a large number of people with Celtic ancestry, (and a number of us who are in the age bracket) I am curious if there are others with this diagnosis.

I don't know how my reply was duplicated and don't know how to undo it. Sorry.

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This is very interesting. A year ago, at my annual physical, my doctor noticed I was anemic. Further investigation found that I was not absorbing B12 into my bloodstream, and so pernicious anemia was the diagnosis. Taking large doses of sublingual .B12 has solved this problem, but I still am mildly anemic. My doctor asked if I had any ancestry from southern Europe. Well, I am a Welsh Celt, and it is known that this branch of Celts resided in the Iberian peninsula many moons ago. Now I am going for my physical next week, and my bloodwork shows that my RBC count, Hemoglobin and Hemocrit are the lowest they have been in the last year, even though I have maintained a B12 level of over 1,000 for the entire period. Also, I feel healthier right now than I have for many years.

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Very interesting. When I was in process of being diagnosed my physician prescribed that I eat a steak at least once a week. He then put me on the injections, which had a remarkable and quick effect. Later he replaced the injections with daily sublingual 250 mcg, which seem to work fine as long as I let the pastilles dissolve up and I don't chew them. The problem is absorption in the gut, not direct absorption into the bloodstream. 250mcg daily looks like an awful lot, but even sublingual absorption is relatively low, so it has to be regular.

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