CactusJack

Scotland’S Founding Pharaoh

Recommended Posts

At first glance there doesn’t seem to be much connection between the land of the Pyramids and the land of Irn Bru, but that hasn’t put off a number of people, including the ex-owner of Harrods, Mohammed al-Fayed, from believing that Scotland, the place and the people, are in fact descended from an Egyptian princess called Scota.

Such is Mr Fayed’s belief, that he has in the past considered building a statue to this Pharaoh’s daughter, and has even suggested that when the time comes and (he hopes) Scotland at last frees itself from the shackles of England, that our joined ancestral heritage will put him in line for the top job, or in his words: “When you Scots regain your freedom, I’m ready to be your president.” And the president’s home will no doubt be the 65,000-acre Highland estate, Balnagown, that he owns and runs in Sutherland.

Which must, surely, be enough for us all to hasten our vote towards independence…

The claim of Egyptian roots for Scotland does, at first, appear to have some heavy-weight champions beyond the man sometime referred to in Private Eye as the “phoney Pharaoh”. Walter Bower, who wrote his great work of Scottish history “Scotichronicon” in the late 1440s, records his version of where the people of Scotland derived. Here we see for the first time a direct reference to our descent from a Pharaoh’s daughter and her husband, a Greek king. She was Scota, from whence came Scotland, he was Gavthelos, hence Gaelic, and their son was Hiber – which of course leads us to Hibernia.

Bower’s history was not the first place which suggested an exalted history for the Scots, Dust down your copy of the Declaration of Arbroath and you’ll find added weight to our Eastern ancestry. The document was written in 1320 by 51 Barons and Noblemen of Scotland imploring the Pope to intervene on their behalf against the English during the Wars of Independence. Their letter begins:

“Most Holy Father and Lord, we know and from the chronicles and books of the ancients we find that among other famous nations our own, the Scots, has been graced with widespread renown. They journeyed from Greater Scythia by way of the Tyrrhenian Sea and the Pillars of Hercules, and dwelt for a long course of time in Spain among the most savage tribes, but nowhere could they be subdued by any race, however barbarous.”

So far, so good, except that few historians regard this origin-myth as anything more than political bigging-up by a nation who needed to make themselves more grandiose than they were by attempting to trace their roots back to Biblical times. At the very least they might have thought it would impress the Pope.

The idea of Scota, the princess, gained more of a following with the publication of Ralph Ellis’s book “Scota, Egyptian Queen of the Scots”. Ellis uses as his starting off point an ancient text: “The History of Egypt’ written in 300BC by an Egypto-Greek historian called Manetho Ellis. This recounts the story of a royal family’s expulsion from Egypt during a time of war and uprising.

Using Manetho’s text as a starting point, Ellis then identified Scota as Ankhesenamun, daughter of Akhenaton and Nefertiti. He tracks the family’s journey west where, according to Ellis, they had ships enough for 1,000 of their followers and plentiful supplies. They landed first in Spain, where they lived for several generations, their first-born son Hiber, giving rise to the naming of the area as Iberian. Later they moved to Ireland where Ellis offers archaeological proof in the form of necklaces found there which resemble Egyptian torcs and tombs which he suggests could only have been built with Egyptian know-how.

From Ireland to Scotland was a short boat-ride and so, the Pharaonic family eventually crossed the water, bringing with them, yes, you’ve guessed, Jacob’s Pillow, AKA the Stone of Destiny.

It is certainly a great yarn and one that Al-Fayed has taken very much to heart. Sadly, historians’ reactions to the idea that Scotland was born of Pharaoh’s daughter tend to vary between dismissing it as either “rubbish” or “complete rubbish”.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's a yarn that goes back at least far as the Declaration of Arbroath. Personally, I lean the other way, that Egypt was populated originally by proto-Celts. Although at first it seems far-fetched, there is in fact some quite believable circumstantial evidence which I've given in earlier posts.

Either way, fascinating post, Larry.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd imagine that one of the 'global' DNA projects could, in short order, either verify much of this or put it to the sword.

It's amazing some of the connections they've been able to make or break, and I'm frankly surprised that a legend of this order hasn't been the focus of some dedicated analysis yet.

As an aside, "Oh look, you're not even free of England yet, and you've already got yerselfs a Pharaoh! :lol:"

Edited by artificer

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Now that is very interesting. The thought had never crossed my mind.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well unless something has changed that I am not aware of al Fayed has never been granted UK citizenship.

Perhaps this is part of it. :P

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That & the fact that Dodi or his offspring never got into the Royal family. Al-Fayid desperately wants to be the big cheese SOMEWHERE...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

He can be the "head" cheese on a sunken frigate in the atlantic. :P

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My apologies, in advance, for not providing sources, but I find that the more research I do (especially if it ends up down rabbit holes) certainly warrants documenting the same... One such expedition indicated that the descendants of the biblical Joseph spent 7 years on a fleet of ships eventually ending up in Scotland after a brief(ish) stop at Ireland, after a brief(ish) stop at Spain, etc.  Further "rabbit-holing" took me to 2 separate rabbinical studies of the word used for Joseph's "coat of many colors", that dependent upon the context of use, would denote either squares or cubes. Coupling this with a culture clothed in tunics or robes it's not hard to imagine that Joseph's "Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat" may indeed have been, at the least, kilt-ish.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now