fendigaid.: aka red sonia.

Celtic Pronounced Seltic?

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when i say i am celtic {Seltic}, i often get corrected by others to pronounce my heritage as celtic {Keltic}. in my heart and mind i know i am to

pronounce it celtic {Seltic}, though i do not wish to discuss it with those that correct me, thus i mention, that i am CELTIBERIAN {SeltIberian, which is pre-Roman Celt & Iberian peninsula, where our people migrated before founding Ireland {Eire Land of the goddess Eire}, etc. i do know that our Celtic Kells {Keltic Kells is the one thing pronounced in this manner with the hard K, and is our book of metaphors/analogies/scriptures, bible}. I have written about this in one of my books {authored}, as well as other fantastic things about our migratory tribes.:0) so to those i meet, even when i know things i've never been taught nor read, as it is in my family's dna, i merely/humbly state, yes, but i am CeltIberian {SeltIberian}, and there is never need of explanation, however, if a person is open to understanding more about me, then yes, i will give some insight.:0) just as pyrenees is another place we'd settled in and what that name {nam pyr} means.:0) or just like mount sepharad and our highlander's homeland.:0) or why the CeltIberian peninsula became donned with the new Phoenician name of Span {later changed by the Roman's dialect}.:0) i do not mind sharing these tidbits/milestones with those who hold an interest, and that is why i do not stand on a pulpit, thus instead i write these things in a book, written there for those who truly seek.:0) smiles.:0) LsL aka sLw.:0) fendigaid.:

Edited by fendigaid.: aka red sonia.

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so did you actually say which you believe to be correct, K or S, or is it a personal preference, like calling Jupiter 'Iupiter Optimus Maximus' ?

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It's worth pointing out that the word Celt comes from the Greek "Keltoi" (the various tribes were known to each other by their tribal names until quite late in their history) and that the Celts themselves had no "hard" C in their language. The closest the Celts came to softening a C was in the Germanic-sounding "Ch".

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so did you actually say which you believe to be correct, K or S, or is it a personal preference, like calling Jupiter 'Iupiter Optimus Maximus' ?

warm smiles.:0)

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It's worth pointing out that the word Celt comes from the Greek "Keltoi" (the various tribes were known to each other by their tribal names until quite late in their history) and that the Celts themselves had no "hard" C in their language. The closest the Celts came to softening a C was in the Germanic-sounding "Ch".

thank you for your reference/insight. whether in concurrenc or not, it was much appreciated, thank you again.:0)

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It's worth pointing out that the word Celt comes from the Greek "Keltoi" (the various tribes were known to each other by their tribal names until quite late in their history) and that the Celts themselves had no "hard" C in their language. The closest the Celts came to softening a C was in the Germanic-sounding "Ch".

Chili: This is an excellent observation. I like the credo here at BOTK about any one can wear the kilt, but I like the pan Celtic term Keltoi very much as well. While it has been an infrequent occurrence I have been told I have no right to wear a kilt because I am not a Scot. History has plenty of examples of non Scots, but Celts, wearing the kilt. Keltoi is a great term (and also one of my fave kiltmakers).

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While it has been an infrequent occurrence I have been told I have no right to wear a kilt because I am not a Scot. History has plenty of examples of non Scots, but Celts, wearing the kilt.

A kilt is an article of clothing.

Period.

Why you wear it, is your business.

Period.

Otherwise, what's next? Being forbidden to wear purple, because it's the "royal" color?

End of hi-jack.

Back on topic,

It has always been my belief that Celtic (or any other word) should be spoken within the structure & norms of the speaker's native dialect (especially when there is controversy or indecision regarding the word in question)

In my case, I speak south-central "Pennsylachia" - therefore the "C" in Celtic could be either soft or hard (as in 'cell' or 'cave'.

So, in my case, we're right back where we started. :)

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@ Seanachie.....whoever told you not to wear a kilt is an idiot, especially since you wear it well!!!!

Caucasian people should not wear baseball hats sideways with their p@nt$ below their butt (showing my double standard side now I suppose)

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The pronunciation depends upon whether or not I am talking about basketball.

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Fair point Spectre. When it comes to football, that other mob are pronounced Glasgow "Selltic" but in my opinion (& with my tongue firmly in my cheek, before anyone gets their panties in a bunch!) they dont count anyway.

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i was raised in the boston area so i heard 'sel-tic' all the time cause of basketball but personally i say it as 'kel-tic'. it was a hard habit to break for me though.

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so did you actually say which you believe to be correct, K or S, or is it a personal preference, like calling Jupiter 'Iupiter Optimus Maximus' ?

or pronouncing Uranus as if it refers to anatomy?

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Chili: This is an excellent observation. I like the credo here at BOTK about any one can wear the kilt, but I like the pan Celtic term Keltoi very much as well. While it has been an infrequent occurrence I have been told I have no right to wear a kilt because I am not a Scot. History has plenty of examples of non Scots, but Celts, wearing the kilt. Keltoi is a great term (and also one of my fave kiltmakers).

there were also the highlanders from sepharad, they were not called Scots until much later. though they migrated to CeltIberia, they then found Ireland {after the godess Eire}, and the united kingdom became united much in the way of: nueva espana {hispania}, later called the Americas. so united kingdom is similar to united states, filled with foreigners, immigrants, colonies, conquerers, etc. thus, not just scots wear kilts {skirts in the plaid of their tribe {name/family/tartan}, that could easily be removed as a blanket {multiple use}, however, it may be that mostly scots or united kingdom did not fully reform to troo$er$. lest we forget the clout. and by the way, clout=kilt??? cheers mate. enjoy your dna, for if the desire is there, it is your dna, generating forward into your genes {or kilt}, smiles.:0)

Edited by fendigaid.: aka red sonia.

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The pronunciation depends upon whether or not I am talking about basketball.

warm smiles.:0) that's very funny.:0)

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i was raised in the boston area so i heard 'sel-tic' all the time cause of basketball but personally i say it as 'kel-tic'. it was a hard habit to break for me though.

thank you for your much appreciated input/philosophy.:0) warm smiles.:0)

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Fair point Spectre. When it comes to football, that other mob are pronounced Glasgow "Selltic" but in my opinion (& with my tongue firmly in my cheek, before anyone gets their panties in a bunch!) they dont count anyway.

warm smiles.:0)

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@ Seanachie.....whoever told you not to wear a kilt is an idiot, especially since you wear it well!!!!

Caucasian people should not wear baseball hats sideways with their p@nt$ below their butt (showing my double standard side now I suppose)

warm smiles.:0) funny.:0)

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A kilt is an article of clothing.

Period.

Why you wear it, is your business.

Period.

Otherwise, what's next? Being forbidden to wear purple, because it's the "royal" color?

End of hi-jack.

Back on topic,

It has always been my belief that Celtic (or any other word) should be spoken within the structure & norms of the speaker's native dialect (especially when there is controversy or indecision regarding the word in question)

In my case, I speak south-central "Pennsylachia" - therefore the "C" in Celtic could be either soft or hard (as in 'cell' or 'cave'.

So, in my case, we're right back where we started. :)

warm smiles.:0) thank you for your much appreciated points of view.:0)

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On My facebook - I sent out a request to My Family and Friends here in the U.S. and over in Scotland about their pronunciation of the word CELTIC the results : 80% pronounce with the K (Keltic)20% pronounce with the S (Seltic).

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On My facebook - I sent out a request to My Family and Friends here in the U.S. and over in Scotland about their pronunciation of the word CELTIC the results : 80% pronounce with the K (Keltic)20% pronounce with the S (Seltic).

thank you for your time and energy to research your family & friend's pronounciation. i would have to say that the % is higher in mine to pronounce it with the "s" thus when speaking to those who prefer to pronounce it with the "k" we politely then reply, we are celtiberian. that seems to be a bit more accepted with the "s" for some reason, and i prefer to keep peace, and tranquility among the clans.:0) warm smiles to you and your efforts.:0)

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when i say i am celtic {Seltic}, i often get corrected by others to pronounce my heritage as celtic {Keltic}. in my heart and mind i know i am to

pronounce it celtic {Seltic}, though i do not wish to discuss it with those that correct me, thus i mention, that i am CELTIBERIAN {SeltIberian, which is pre-Roman Celt & Iberian peninsula, where our people migrated before founding Ireland {Eire Land of the goddess Eire}, etc. i do know that our Celtic Kells {Keltic Kells is the one thing pronounced in this manner with the hard K, and is our book of metaphors/analogies/scriptures, bible}. I have written about this in one of my books {authored}, as well as other fantastic things about our migratory tribes.:0) so to those i meet, even when i know things i've never been taught nor read, as it is in my family's dna, i merely/humbly state, yes, but i am CeltIberian {SeltIberian}, and there is never need of explanation, however, if a person is open to understanding more about me, then yes, i will give some insight.:0) just as pyrenees is another place we'd settled in and what that name {nam pyr} means.:0) or just like mount sepharad and our highlander's homeland.:0) or why the CeltIberian peninsula became donned with the new Phoenician name of Span {later changed by the Roman's dialect}.:0) i do not mind sharing these tidbits/milestones with those who hold an interest, and that is why i do not stand on a pulpit, thus instead i write these things in a book, written there for those who truly seek.:0) smiles.:0) LsL aka sLw.:0) fendigaid.:

there were also the highlanders from sepharad, they were not called Scots until much later. though they migrated to CeltIberia, they then found Ireland {after the godess Eire}, and the united kingdom became united much in the way of: nueva espana {hispania}, later called the Americas. so united kingdom is similar to united states, filled with foreigners, immigrants, colonies, conquerers, etc. thus, not just scots wear kilts {skirts in the plaid of their tribe {name/family/tartan}, that could easily be removed as a blanket {multiple use}, however, it may be that mostly scots or united kingdom did not fully reform to troo$er$. lest we forget the clout. and by the way, clout=kilt??? cheers mate. enjoy your dna, for if the desire is there, it is your dna, generating forward into your genes {or kilt}, smiles.:0)

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Appears either way is correct, but using the Irish dictionary in my hand, I can immediately see that the majority of C words begin with the K sound, including croi (heart) and ceili. Apologies to those who like to see the accent marks but I haven't figured out how to type a fada over the appropriate vowels.

To follow, a couple of quotes from a variety of sources.

"There was at one point, and maybe still is, some preference depending on your region. Either can be said without being wrong, however, Celtic goes back through the French Celtique where the s-sound was acquired, coming from the Latin Celticus prior to that (where it was pronounced with a k). seltic would be the correct pronunciation currently, in keeping with modern English. There is authority for saying keltic from its origins, but no reason to do so anymore."

"I was always taught "seltic" when I was young, but I have a friend who is Irish, and he pronounces it "keltic," so that is what I go with these days. Since "c" in Irish is pronounced like a k, I would assume that the k sound would be closer to the original Gaelic from which "Celt" came from anyways; Celt would have the same k sound--Kelt...Seltic never sounded right to me anyways, leave it to the Yankees to botch up languages."

But to sign off, my handle Conn (Konn) is the origin of my family name, changing to Cuinn (people of Conn), U'Cuinn, O'Cuinn, and then at some point Quinn. I hope we haven't gotten it wrong all these years:) Are we supposed to be Suinn, U'Suinn, and Suinn? Think I'll stick with Keltic and Keltoi.

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"There was at one point, and maybe still is, some preference depending on your region. Either can be said without being wrong, however, Celtic goes back through the French Celtique where the s-sound was acquired, coming from the Latin Celticus prior to that (where it was pronounced with a k). seltic would be the correct pronunciation currently, in keeping with modern English. There is authority for saying keltic from its origins, but no reason to do so anymore."

In central and eastern Pennsylvania, there are a lot of folks who are actually German, but through a mispronunciation of their nation in another's tongue, have come to be called "Dutch". For those who know better, is there "no reason to (call them German) anymore"?

Then I think I'll stick with calling myself "Kelt".

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In central and eastern Pennsylvania, there are a lot of folks who are actually German, but through a mispronunciation of their nation in another's tongue, have come to be called "Dutch". For those who know better, is there "no reason to (call them German) anymore"?

Then I think I'll stick with calling myself "Kelt".

deutche or dutch, i guess you make a valid point, thank you for participating.:0)

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Appears either way is correct, but using the Irish dictionary in my hand, I can immediately see that the majority of C words begin with the K sound, including croi (heart) and ceili. Apologies to those who like to see the accent marks but I haven't figured out how to type a fada over the appropriate vowels.

To follow, a couple of quotes from a variety of sources.

"There was at one point, and maybe still is, some preference depending on your region. Either can be said without being wrong, however, Celtic goes back through the French Celtique where the s-sound was acquired, coming from the Latin Celticus prior to that (where it was pronounced with a k). seltic would be the correct pronunciation currently, in keeping with modern English. There is authority for saying keltic from its origins, but no reason to do so anymore."

"I was always taught "seltic" when I was young, but I have a friend who is Irish, and he pronounces it "keltic," so that is what I go with these days. Since "c" in Irish is pronounced like a k, I would assume that the k sound would be closer to the original Gaelic from which "Celt" came from anyways; Celt would have the same k sound--Kelt...Seltic never sounded right to me anyways, leave it to the Yankees to botch up languages."

But to sign off, my handle Conn (Konn) is the origin of my family name, changing to Cuinn (people of Conn), U'Cuinn, O'Cuinn, and then at some point Quinn. I hope we haven't gotten it wrong all these years:) Are we supposed to be Suinn, U'Suinn, and Suinn? Think I'll stick with Keltic and Keltoi.

thank you so very much for your in depth participation, much appreciated. one question. which region is that dictionary's origin? smiles, just joking {ioking?} with you.:0) ciao for now, fendigaid.: aka LsL.:0)

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