KiltedTexan

The Celtic Nations

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So I've always heard oh the 7 Celtic Nations

1. Scotland

2. Ireland

3. Isle of Mann

4. Whales

5. Cornwall

6. Galicia

7. Brittany

So, what the heck is Asturias?

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http://www.ask.com/wiki/Kingdom_of_Asturias

Think Northern Spain. There is a paragraph in the above article that covers the Celtic influence found there. Some argue wether the number of celtic nations should be expanded. I've seen evidence presented by various websites that put Celts in Canada and the US. Who knows what future research will bring.

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http://www.ask.com/w...dom_of_Asturias

Think Northern Spain. There is a paragraph in the above article that covers the Celtic influence found there. Some argue wether the number of celtic nations should be expanded. I've seen evidence presented by various websites that put Celts in Canada and the US. Who knows what future research will bring.

I know where it is, but is it considered a celtic nation?

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http://www.ask.com/w...dom_of_Asturias

Think Northern Spain. There is a paragraph in the above article that covers the Celtic influence found there. Some argue wether the number of celtic nations should be expanded. I've seen evidence presented by various websites that put Celts in Canada and the US. Who knows what future research will bring.

http://www.ask.com/w...dom_of_Asturias

Think Northern Spain. There is a paragraph in the above article that covers the Celtic influence found there. Some argue wether the number of celtic nations should be expanded. I've seen evidence presented by various websites that put Celts in Canada and the US. Who knows what future research will bring.

There is Celtic influanced art and stuff in germany too. in fact there were german celts.

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First Celtic tribe mentioned by the Romans were the Bulgarii. It's pretty much accepted that the Celts originated somewhere around Bulgaria & expanded along the Danube. This would make a large part of Eastern Europe Celtic in origin

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Actually there are only six recognized Celtic Nations.

Scotland, Ireland, Whales, Cornwall, Brittany, and The Isle of Mann

The Celtic nations are territories in North-West Europe in which that area's own Celtic languages and some cultural traits have survived. The term "nation" is used in its original sense to mean a people who share a common traditional identity and culture and are identified with a traditional territory or region. It is not synonymous with "sovereign state".

The six territories recognised as Celtic nations are Brittany (Breizh), Cornwall (Kernow), Ireland (Éire), the Isle of Man (Mannin), Scotland (Alba), and Wales (Cymru).Each of these regions has a Celtic language that is either still spoken or was spoken into modern times. In addition, areas of north-western Iberia, particularly Galicia and Asturias, are sometimes identified as Celtic, due to the unique culture of the region. Unlike the others, however, no Celtic language has been spoken there in modern times. Before the expansions of the Roman Republic and Germanic tribes, a significant part of Europe was Celtic.

Each of the six nations has its own Celtic language. In Wales, Scotland, Brittany, and Ireland, these have been spoken continuously through time, while Cornwall and the Isle of Man have languages that were spoken into modern times but later died as spoken community languages. In both of the latter regions, however, revitalization movements have led to the adoption of these languages by adults and produced a number of native speakers.

Ireland, Wales, Brittany and Scotland contain areas where a Celtic language is used on a daily basis – in Ireland the area is called the Gaeltacht, Y Fro Gymraeg in Wales, and in Brittany Breizh-Izel. Generally these communities are in the west of their countries and in upland or island areas. The term Gàidhealtachd historically distinguished the Gaelic-speaking areas of Scotland (the Highlands) from the Lowland Scots-speaking areas. More recently, this term has also been adopted as the Gaelic name of the Highland council area, which includes non-Gaelic speaking areas. Hence, more specific terms such as sgìre Ghàidhlig ("Gaelic-speaking area") are now used.

In Wales, the Welsh language is a core curriculum (compulsory) subject, which all pupils study.[ Additionally, 20% of school children in Wales go to Welsh medium schools, where "they are taught entirely in the Welsh language". In the Republic of Ireland, all school children study Irish as one of the three core subjects up until the end of secondary school and 7.4% of primary school education is through Irish medium education which is part of the Gaelscoil movement.

Parts of the northern Iberian Peninsula, in particular Asturias and Galicia, are sometimes counted among the modern Celtic nations. This is largely due to the region's unique culture, which is distinct from that in some other areas of Spain and Portugal. Notably, the region's music features extensive use of bagpipes, an instrument common in modern Celtic music. As such musicians from Galicia and Asturias have participated in Celtic music festivals such as the Breton Festival des Cornemuses. Northern Portugal, part of ancient Gallaecia (Galicia, Minho, Douro and Tras-os-Montes), also has traditions quite similar to Galicia. However, unlike the traditional six nations, no Celtic language has been spoken in northern Iberia since probably the Early Middle Ages.

200px-Celtic_Nations1.svg.png

All of this is according to The Celtic League.

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Ah, but none of them WERE Gaelic, with the exception of Ireland., which was originally colonised by proto-Scots anyway. None of the rest spoke Gaelic until the Gaels invaded. (This is easily verified by the account of St. Columba needing a translator for his visit with the Pictish King Brude).

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Would the Isle Of Skye be included as a Celtic Nation?

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Interesting question, as it was originally Norwegian territory. However, they do speak Gaelic,& are recognisably Scots in spite of their embracing of Viking culture

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Would the Isle Of Skye be included as a Celtic Nation?

Skye is part of Scotland, it is home of the the Clan MacLeod. It isn't considered a nation, unlike the Isle of Mann.

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Oh, ok. Thanks. I was not aware!

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