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Cruach Mor!

Finding Arthur - Adam Ardrey

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I seldom write reviews on Amazon, but I was compelled to do so with this book. The author succeeds in digging out the real man from under the legends and myths. A highly recommended read for Arthurian fans and for those who want the facts behind the myths. It turns out that the real Arthur was not English, not Christian and not a king, but a Scottish warlord of exceptional talent and accomplishment.

Ardrey is a master at understanding and explaining the process of the deliberate development of myths by medieval clerics and poets with religious and political agendas. He makes sense of conflicting and distorted accounts, documenting the how and why by examining and analysing an exhaustive library of early sources in five languages - Q-Celtic, P-Celtic, Latin, French and English.

Very insightful and enlightening, as was his earlier work in Finding Merlin.

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Excellent, thanks. I am very much in to the Arthurian legend, so I'll have to check this out.

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Sounds interesting. Your review was just perfect enough to pique my curiosity and say to myself, "I need to find out how he came to that conclusion."

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I'll have to add it to my collection. One shelf of my library is for knighthood of various orders.

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Sounds good I will have to read it. but the earliest account I have read and seen was that he was Welsh.

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Sounds good I will have to read it. but the earliest account I have read and seen was that he was Welsh.

Okay, case closed. He was Welsh. On behalf of all Welsh folk, we are happy to accept Arthur as our own.

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Okay, case closed. He was Welsh. On behalf of all Welsh folk, we are happy to accept Arthur as our own.

No, sorry, but he wasn't Welsh any more than he was English. The Welsh version has just as many problems as the south of England version. Ardrey addresses these issues thoroughly. I would not attempt to try to do that here.

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No, sorry, but he wasn't Welsh any more than he was English. The Welsh version has just as many problems as the south of England version. Ardrey addresses these issues thoroughly. I would not attempt to try to do that here.

Oh c'mon! Can't you let me enjoy that for a few days at least?

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Well, I can sympathize. My mother's father was Welsh and Irish. The book has not received a warm welcome in either Wales or England, and understandably so. Nonetheless, Ardrey's case for Arthur being born, living, fighting and dying in what is now Scotland makes perfect sense upon careful analysis.

It's all rather moot as far as nationality claims. In Arthur's time there was no Wales, England or Scotland. Arthur's father (not Uther Pen Dragon - literally "the other chief of the people of the dragon") was king of both Dalriada and Manau, both of which are now in the Highlands of Scotland.

BTW, Merlin was not English or Welsh either. He was of the kingdom of Strathclyde, also now part of Scotland. He was neither a "wizard" nor magician, but rather a druid - a learned leader and teacher. Ardrey has another book titled Finding Merlin which tells his part of the story.

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After reading the first post on this thread I checked 'Finding Merlin' out of the library. The author makes the case that Merlin and Arthur (who plays very little role in the Merlin book) were the real-life individuals of those names from Scotland. If he is right, then he has additional information to work from as there are written accounts of those people. Still, he has to work from very limited and highly biased accounts. From these accounts he extrapolates a coherent and meaningful story of the life of Merlin. It involves a lot of 'here is the story we have, here is the filter the story was written through, here are my thoughts about what the original story entailed' He lays it all out intelligently and I am willing to accept his interpretation as being reasonable, knowing that he can't possibly be correct in all of his decisions. The resulting work, however, provides a very interesting and somehow rewarding look at Merlin and his life, and was also my first look at that time period in Scotland.

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I found Finding Arthur to be even more interesting. Same methods, even more spectacular results. He has set British history on its ear.

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