KT

How to stay warm while kilted

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here are pointers on how to stay warm in cold as hell weather while kilted ( even regimentally so!)

How to dress:

I'll start at the bottom:

~warm boot or shoes. if your feet get cold or wet, you might as well pack it in and go home.

~wool kilt hose or other knee-length winter "performance" socks. Pull these bad boys up.

~A kilt. PV won't cut it, neither will a "casual" five yarder (knife pleated, that is). 8 yards knife pleated, or a four yard box pleat. SWK heavyweight or a 13oz+ wool kilt for inclement weather are fine examples

upper body (VERY important!)

~cover everything. Fleece, gloves, hat, wind-proof jacket, the works.

ok, here it where this comes from.

I grew up on the coast of Massachusetts, and I'm sure everyone has heard of a Nor'Easter (wicked nasty blizzard for the uninitiated). I was on the winter track team, and three days a week we ran three miles outside, regardless of weather or temperature. I learned one VERY important bit of information that applied directly to cold-weather kilting. If you are outside, you CAN have exposed legs and still be warm! you need to keep everything else covered, but your legs could be exposed to some extent without causing serious problems. If you keep moving it is even less of an issue. This worked to down around 0 degrees, in the snow.

you can see pics around the forum and website of me out in very cold weather kilted. I look like an eskimo from the waste up, but the rest is just warm boots, good socks and a wool kilt.

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Most heat loss is from your head. The feet/hands are a close second. Bundle up, yes but keep the head, hands and feet warm are you'll not have major problems.

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<_< Staying inside, warm by the fire and drunk works for me !!! B)

Budog. B)

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This is a good Topic as it is probably the most asked question I ever get.

Kilts, trap a HUGE pocket of warm air around the body as well as a lot of warm air within the fibers of the wool.

Blue jeans and slacks, ONLY trap warm air around the body as long as you do not move. Once you start moving, there's a thing called compression that pushes any warm air that might have been there right out and leaves you with a cold layer of cotton pressing right against your leg. That will warm up after a droping the surface temperature of your skin quite a bit but as soon as the cotton leaves your skin, it drops in temperature again almost instantly. Then they touch your leg again and continue to drop your surface temp. even lower. Before long, you're nicely chilled.

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HeathandAmyStonewithLarry.jpg

The above photo was taken at an altitude of about 4500 feet in the New Found Gap between Gatlinburg, TN and Cherokee, NC. Temperature was 16*F, and humidity was low. Winds were light to calm.

Shoes - Nike running shoes

Hose - Cotton Kilt hose from Hamilton Dry Goods, with homemade flashes and garters

Kilt - USA Semi-Traditional Poly-Vis, in MacDonald Tartan

Upper Body - Navy blue cotton shirt (no undershirt), with black leather vest and silver bolo tie

Bonnet - Black woolen GI-surplus beret with MacDonald Badge

As you will notice the young couple in the photo with me were shivering with the cold. The only part of me cold were my hands. That was because just before the Stones came back to take photos of the kilted guy, my wife and I had been engaging in a rather lively snowball fight. Since I was gloveless, the old hands got rather chilled.

I won't argue that a poly-vis kilt will keep you warm in a blizzard, but I was perfectly comfortable at 16*F. I'd say that poly-vis kilts work better in cold weather than KT is giving them credit. Not saying I'd go out in a Nor'easter wearing one, but I'd not want to face one of those things dressed in a down insulated coverall either.

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Don't forget that you carry an immersion heater under there as well.

:sterb029:

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despite the namby pamby thought that alcohol actually worsens cold air injuries....i like a bit of whiskey in the jar.

ok..serious now.

keep your head and neck covered and protect the core. the extremities will be the first to sacrifice blood flow when core temp drops..so if you have cold digits and toots...put on a hat.

my trad kilt keeps me plenty warm when worn with hose and a sweater in all but the coldest wind.

ive spent MANY a night in a snow cave...stay dry and maintain warm air around your core.

to this day the smell of pine boughs makes me shiver.

one night..i was tired and lazy and didnt lay down enough insulation in the cave ( AF cold weather survival course) woke up shivering and miserable...dragged my rear outta the cave and LUMP'd ( LT under mental pressure) and placed my rear on a log... a LUMP on a log...any way..i had taken my mickey mouses off trying to warm my toes...drifted off a bit and was thumped awake by one of the troops..." uh...house...your feet are on fire sir" they were just smoldering...stomped em out and drifted off to sleep for another 10...

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I wrote the following last winter on Bear's kilt forum, KiltCheck, but I thought it would go well here anyway:

As you fellas know I'm a bit of a kilt militant who wears kilts all the time. Here lately it's gotten damned cold but I am determined to test kilts under all kinds of work conditions. A few weeks ago it was so cold that I put a pair of longjohns on under my kilt ... looked a bit funny at first, but worked great.

On that same day my helper put on longjohns under his work jeans. As the day went on and we both began to get warm on account of the physical activity of the job we both began to over heat a bit. I pealed off my longjohns and continued working very comfortably. My helper, well he just sweltered in his jeans and longjohns. At one point I had to make him stop work to cool off a bit.

Also, in case anyone else wants to try this, I cut the cuffs off the bottom of my longjohns so I could put them on and take them off without removing my boots. when worn it looks like they are tucked into my workboots. It was really cool (hehe) to be able to take clothes off my legs just like you can take a coat off your body when I was all warmed up from working.

Ain't kilts great.

Kilt On!

Chris Webb

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I can't speak for wearing the kilt in cold weather... But I can relate to having bare legs in cold weather. I have worn shorts full-time (outside of work) for nearly 20 years. I have rarely gotten cold. The secret is to not stop moving, or wear warm clothes on the top. Granted, I've never done this in sub 10 degree weather.

People give me so much cr4p for that... But I always just smile at them and say, "And you're cold?"

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Been posted on other fourms, but...

Last year I worked on a music video (Bone Thugs & Harmony if anyone cares) in Cleveland. Actual temp was around 7F (Wind chill in the - #) and drifts of snow 2' in places. I was wearing a PK (it was lined), 2 shirts, kilt hose, hat, gloves, scarf, calf length navy watch coat, fleece jacket, and Scottish military knee wraps (wool) and a pair of unmentionables (boxer briefs specifically). I was outside for over 7 hours at one stretch (and about 10 hours total during the day). I was by far the warmest person on the set.

Adam

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hmm this helps, as i have been debating kilting up in fear of the cold weather we have here this year. i guess i need to get some boots and kilt hose. thanks guys. i have learned from my ROTC orienteering training, that underarmor works good under your shirt, and like everybody said, just stay moving and you have no worries.

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I've had my kilts actually freeze solid.

Sub zero freezing rain. Brr.

that makes me kinda flinch a lil bit, just to think about.

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that makes me kinda flinch a lil bit, just to think about.

It isn't as bad as you would think.

Once the kilt saturates with water and freezes solid, the wind can no longer blow it up causing your bubble of heated air to escape. Also, the frozen fabric really holds in the heat in.

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I've had my kilts actually freeze solid.

Sub zero freezing rain. Brr.

Sounds like Carolina winters.

I HATE freezing rain!

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It isn't as bad as you would think.

Once the kilt saturates with water and freezes solid, the wind can no longer blow it up causing your bubble of heated air to escape. Also, the frozen fabric really holds in the heat in.

That reminds me Dread.

I read somewhere that Highlanders on Patrol during winter weather would soak their great kilts in a nearby burn before using them for blankets. Have you ever heard of this? Do you believe it would actually act as insulation or would a person freeze solid?

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That reminds me Dread.

I read somewhere that Highlanders on Patrol during winter weather would soak their great kilts in a nearby burn before using them for blankets. Have you ever heard of this? Do you believe it would actually act as insulation or would a person freeze solid?

Yes, it would work, provided you had on a layer under it. Solid wind barrier. Same way huskies roll in snow to impregnate their coats with moisture before dealing with sub zero cold.

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you can see pics around the forum and website of me out in very cold weather kilted. I look like an eskimo from the waste up, but the rest is just warm boots, good socks and a wool kilt.

hey kt, i must be a bad looker but i couldnt find a bunled kt pic. could you link to 1 or 2 on this thread? just curious about the look.

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Another tip I learned during my years in the scouts, as a skinner and a draft surveyor on the Ohio River, spray your feet with antiperspirant. When your feet get warm, they like to sweat (mine do) and when that happened it can get cold fast. The antiperspirant stops the sweating, thus keeping your feet warm.

And not to mention the lack of odor will make everyone around you happier when the boot come off.

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:icon_super: Staying inside, warm by the fire and drunk works for me !!! :beerchug:

Budog. B)

Now THAT is a BUD abter mine own heart :cloud9:

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Sure-fire method:

TW693.jpg

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