Sign in to follow this  
ScottyB

Not Scottish, but fun to do...

Recommended Posts

I bought a Cold Steel Trail Hawk a few years ago and made some minor adjustments. It originally had black paint on the carbon steel head. Sanded that off right away. Also stained the hickory handle in a red oak color. Did a forced mustard patina to the head. This morning I had nothing to do so I did some file work on it. Nothing ornate, but enuf to give it some bling. Then I did some more patina on it with lemon juice. Going for sorta a rustic look. After that I put a convex edge on the blade. It's scary sharp now. What yinz think?

PICT0159.jpg

PICT0160.jpg

PICT0161.jpg

PICT0162.jpg

The pictures make the head look a light grey. It's a dark grey with some black streaks.

I actually use this hawk when I'm out stick hunting.

[[Template core/front/global/commentEditLine is throwing an error. This theme may be out of date. Run the support tool in the AdminCP to restore the default theme.]]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looks nice. Excuse my ignorance (I'm not all that into axes) but wouldn't a straight edge be better for chopping?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Would history have been changed if the Jacobites had had these choppers below their kilts?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Very cool! I have a hacker of my own and I am expecting a shipment of replica Chippewa and Cherokee tomahawks in as so I can carve in the handles and resell.

I have a couple pics of my carving axe, I broke the POS baltic birch handle so I made on out of black walnut and carved some knot work in her as well, I mean to replace the big gawdy silver screw eventually with something a wee-bit more subtle.

meax2.jpg

meax3.jpg

meax.jpg

I also want to make a cooler looking sheath for her as well.

Hearing the comment about the Jacobites made me think of a pic I saw, although the fellow is a government soldier with the 42nd ( Black Watch ), he has adapted to the North American theater, as you can see the toma, in his belt.

42nd1762.jpg

Cool thread Scotty, keep 'em coming.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Raptor-Not sure if you're referring to the curve from top to bottom or the convex edge I put on it. I'm not sure about the curve from top to bottom. Maybe being a multi task tool as well as a weapon can account for the curve. Note the blade length is only about 2 1/2". I wouldn't use it to drop a 10" round or bigger tree. The convex edge(rounded grind) from what I heard and soon found out cuts like butter. Less friction between wood and steel. Makes for a deeper bite.

John-would be interesting to say the least. LOL

One thing I can say it was fun to mod and even funner to play with. There is a set screw on the other side of the head. Tighten it to use the hawk as a chopper. Loosen it for throwing fun. This way the handle can come off and not snap in half if you have a bad throw.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I really like your hawk KC. Been wanting to pick up one for my BOB. It would fit perfect inside. The knot work is killer!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks bro, I am sure you can whip up some cool stuff on yours as well. I dig axes more than blades, I like carrying mine in my belt at festivals , people usually do a double take,...

I dig that Cold Steel one, I have been wondering about them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cold Steel usually gets a bad rap for one reason or another. I like their stuff. Also have a few of their knives. They're all users and not once failed me. This hawk at the time only cost me $20. Not bad for a beginner traditional looking hawk.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice looking hawk. Beautiful carving. I too have cold steel. I carry a cold steel sgian.

Hutch. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

yep, meant the top to bottom edge. I can see a straight angled face, but the curve would have to mean that all the impact is in one small area. Great for penetrating power, but not much for chopping as far as I can see.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Very cool! I have a hacker of my own and I am expecting a shipment of replica Chippewa and Cherokee tomahawks in as so I can carve in the handles and resell.

I have a couple pics of my carving axe, I broke the POS baltic birch handle so I made on out of black walnut and carved some knot work in her as well, I mean to replace the big gawdy silver screw eventually with something a wee-bit more subtle.

meax2.jpg

meax3.jpg

meax.jpg

I also want to make a cooler looking sheath for her as well.

Hearing the comment about the Jacobites made me think of a pic I saw, although the fellow is a government soldier with the 42nd ( Black Watch ), he has adapted to the North American theater, as you can see the toma, in his belt.

42nd1762.jpg

Cool thread Scotty, keep 'em coming.

I love this photo! It shows how resourceful, and adaptive the Highlanders were. Check out the mockisins (sp?) and the beaded pouches in addition to the tomahawk. It shows the Native American influence on those who came over here in the early days. Very Very cool!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

From the little bit I have read, the Indians and Highlanders had an understanding of each other, more so than others. Both being from a clan based system, even enemy tribes had great respect for the Scots. The book the plate is from is an Osprey publication titled 18th Century Highlanders, and another really good one that covers the Regiments in the colonies is Highlander in the French Indian War ( also by Osprey publishing).

Sorry to stray from wicked axes...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this