oldsoldier

Are there any other UU's here?

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I just (within the past few months) decided to explore religion, and was fortunate to find a UU church locally. I was wondering if there's any other UU's out there?

Briefly, the UU church isnt bound by any specific religious doctrine or credo, instead, they are open to all faiths, all religions (christianity, judaism, islam, wicca, etc), and believe that there are many paths to follow. My first actual service was a few weeks back, and I found it quite refreshing from what I was taught when I was young.

I am NOT one who has been a practicing ANYTHING, since my first communion. I questioned religion at a VERY young age, so much so, that I was no longer taken to church :huh:. In my teens & twenties, I delved into the history of alot of the worlds religions, as the mere history fascinated me, not so much the beliefs.

Now, being in my mid to late 30's, I began to wonder, ponder, question, and kinda look for something larger. I wouldnt quite go so far as to say I was looking for God, but I was looking for SOMETHING I was missing. So, after looking into several churches in the area, I found the UU church, sat down with the resident reverend, and discussed my quest with him. Within 10 minutes of our conversation, I knew I found what I was looking for. I just wanted to share that experience with others. I am NOT one to preach, or push my ideas on others (particularly religion & politics), but, if you are looking for something, and not sure what direction you want to go, I suggest looking into the Unitarian Universalists.

Still not quite sure on the whole God thing, but, I am well aware that I am NOT on the top of the food chain, universally speaking :). Besides, meeting with such a diverse group on Sundays, I learn alot from others within that hour or so, as I hope they learn from me.

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I generally find it awkward to discuss religion or spirituality online, as my views are not even close to statistical norms.

One of the most striking comments I ever heard about any god, and in this case specifically the god of the Judeo-Christian heritage, was that, "He was created by mankind to explain the things mankind did not understand."

What was so profound about this statement was not the statement itself--I happened to feel that way, anyway, and still do. What was so striking to me was that I was told this by a Catholic nun, during a class on history of the Old Testament, at what was then a private, Catholic-affiliated college I was attending on a shared-class basis. Think about THAT one for a moment.

That said, I find I get along better with folks who attend UU churches than with any other denomination, sect, or faith. There is sort of a, "Religion is for those afraid of Hell, spirituality is for those who have been there" (to borrow a bumper sticker slogan I have seen) mentality and ethos. I know several UU members in each of my primary social circles (along with the usual assortment of overzealous wingnuts from all sides of the spectrum), and they have the easier time with my own warped views on the world compared to folks of other faiths.

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One of the most striking comments I ever heard about any god, and in this case specifically the god of the Judeo-Christian heritage, was that, "He was created by mankind to explain the things mankind did not understand."

What was so profound about this statement was not the statement itself--I happened to feel that way, anyway, and still do. What was so striking to me was that I was told this by a Catholic nun,

Mother Theresa wrote several letters to Bishops openly questioning her faith. She remained dedicated to her humanitarian work, but some say she did not actually believe in God or the Church.

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Mother Theresa wrote several letters to Bishops openly questioning her faith. She remained dedicated to her humanitarian work, but some say she did not actually believe in God or the Church.

It is not uncommon for folks to ultimately and deeply question and doubt their faith. Lord knows I have and still do.

As for the UU, I'm beginning to think that that is what I'm closest to. I established the Fellowship of the Gitite in large part because I just couldn't find a church/denomination/faith that fit me ... I'm thinking a Gitite would be welcome, even appreciated, in a UU congregation.

I can't remember if I ever posted here what the Fellowship of the Gitite is or not, if anyone would like to read it I'd be happy to post it in this section of the forum.

Kilt ON!

Chris Webb

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what types of things does the pastor preach at the UU church?

does he or she preach from the bible or the quoran...or something?

it just seems a bit odd to me..

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In a nutshell, they take a little from everything. For instance; this past weekend, we had a yogi in, to teach about the spiritual aspects of Yoga. This coming sunday, they have invited a Wiccan priestess to speak about that aspect. Essentially, UU's teach that there are many, many paths to get in touch with a higher being, and no single path is right, or wrong. Its alot about tolerance, and accepting others for what THEY believe in, without judging them.

Its definitely not for everyone, as some folks simply believe what they want, and believe theirs is the ONLY way. They may be right, they may be wrong. One doesnt know until one passes on, I suppose.

I do learn quite alot though, every weekend. Its a refreshing change from my rather brief foray with religion when I was a kid.

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It is not uncommon for folks to ultimately and deeply question and doubt their faith.

true true. and i see no harm in that.

after all it wouldn't be "faith" if there wasn't doubt. we don't "believe" in the oceans, we don't have "faith" that the oceans exist, because we can all go to the beach and see the oceans.

i'm suspicious of anyone who doesn't have doubts about their own religion.

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I go through my daily doubts.

I think about stuff like, well, how on earth did Moses write the first five books of the Bible when the Hebrew language didn't even exist till almost a thousand years later... Moses learned to read and write in Egyptian. I think about Noah and the Flood and realise that the Epic of Gilgamesh was written hundreds, maybe even a thousand years previous to the story of Noah... Even the ark dimensions in the epic are similar to Noah's. The Bible claims the world is only about six thousand years old, yet there are religious texts found in both Egypt and India that go back 10,000 years or more. In fact, during the Golden Age of Egyptology, back when they found the Rosetta stone and were uncovering ancient Egypt, the Vatican sabotaged many artifacts and did everything they could to keep people from uncovering the truth, that there were glaring mistakes in the Bible. The Vatican had people killed in order to silence them, especially over that Zodiac calendar from one of the temples... The Zodiac calendar was thought to be at least 10,000 years old based on date data. (And was later found to be 11 to 12,000 years old during the 1990s)

So many things that go unanswered. It causes quite a bit of doubt some times.

Heck, even the whole story of David and his life seems to be a copy of a previous epic, written many years before.

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I go through my daily doubts.

I think about stuff like, well, how on earth did Moses write the first five books of the Bible when the Hebrew language didn't even exist till almost a thousand years later... Moses learned to read and write in Egyptian. I think about Noah and the Flood and realise that the Epic of Gilgamesh was written hundreds, maybe even a thousand years previous to the story of Noah... Even the ark dimensions in the epic are similar to Noah's. The Bible claims the world is only about six thousand years old, yet there are religious texts found in both Egypt and India that go back 10,000 years or more. In fact, during the Golden Age of Egyptology, back when they found the Rosetta stone and were uncovering ancient Egypt, the Vatican sabotaged many artifacts and did everything they could to keep people from uncovering the truth, that there were glaring mistakes in the Bible. The Vatican had people killed in order to silence them, especially over that Zodiac calendar from one of the temples... The Zodiac calendar was thought to be at least 10,000 years old based on date data. (And was later found to be 11 to 12,000 years old during the 1990s)

So many things that go unanswered. It causes quite a bit of doubt some times.

Heck, even the whole story of David and his life seems to be a copy of a previous epic, written many years before.

Some of those dates are openly debated.

For example, the OLDEST Hebrew is a present heated argument amongst scholars, as the DATE of Moses (the most common dates are from around 1500 -my belief- or 1250 -Ramses the Great). The history of the Torah is VERY complex, with numerous "linguistic updates" (see Josiah), but it has what is the OLDEST Hebrew known (translated largely based upon the Septuagint, Greek translation).

Now, that doesn't have much to do with this topic, so I'll back off.

(Remember, the MAIN rule here is NO flaming and "be civil and respectful."

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Now you're getting into the difference between Hebrew and Aramaic. Aramaic far precedes Hebrew as a language, both written and spoken.

But this has not much to do with Unitarianism. Does anyone mind a topic wandering away from home?

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Oh, I am not debating the different relevancies of the different religions; looking back through it all, they build atop one another and, one can figure out the history of mankind, by dissecting the dominant religions. Dominant cultures that conquered other ones typically forced their religion onto the conquered culture, but masked alot of holidays, gods, and worship sites with their own. It was easier to allow populations to continue what they were used to, but call it something different, and incorporate into your own religion (ok, thats oversimplifying it, but you get the idea). This, of course, is most illustrated with Christianity, but, thats simply because its what we're most familiar with. It has happened with most, if not ALL, religions. Which illustrates the point of UU; how can there be one simple path, if EVERYONE thinks they are right? Who's to know? So, simply accept a person for what they believe, and dont sweat the small stuff :)

And, me personally, the evidence points to the earth being billions of years old. And, us being a product of evolution. But, thats my own personal belief. What others believe, thats for them. I have no problem believing we descended from apes. I AM a moneky's uncle after all :). Just ask my nieces and nephews.

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I was merely responding to Furrycelt's post about doubts and why I have them. Intention was not to derail.

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I have no problems with derailment. As long as others don't either. Personally, I think your post was great.

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Dread, nor did I take it that way. I thoroughly enjoy discussing different points of view. Besides...its my thread!!! :jumping-smiley-011:

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I'm perusing my latest copy of TIME magazine and what should I find...

A full-page ad for the Unitarian Universalist Association! Page 62 in big, bold letters: "is GOD keeping you from going to CHURCH?"

"Maybe you're uncomfortable with the idea of God - or at least someone else's idea of God. Yet maybe you yearn for a loving, spiritual community where you can be inspired and encouraged as you search for your own truth and meaning. This is a church, you ask? Welcome to Unitarian Universalism."

It's always fascinated me to see a religion take out expensive advertising. Makes me curious about the motives.

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Heh, I've never seen ANY ad for ANY faith, that I recall. I know that my church does ALOT for the local communities; food drives, they open their church to AA/NA meetings, clothing drives, etc. I know that is is one of the smaller organized religions, maybe they are doing a membership drive? Who knows...

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Heh, I've never seen ANY ad for ANY faith, that I recall. I know that my church does ALOT for the local communities; food drives, they open their church to AA/NA meetings, clothing drives, etc. I know that is is one of the smaller organized religions, maybe they are doing a membership drive? Who knows...

I'm not criticizing the Association or its membership. I'm pointing out that crossing big religion with big business can lead to some murky waters. Brings up references to Pat Robertson and Jerry Falwell. Or, more recently, Oral Roberts and his family.

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Heh, I've never seen ANY ad for ANY faith, that I recall. I know that my church does ALOT for the local communities; food drives, they open their church to AA/NA meetings, clothing drives, etc. I know that is is one of the smaller organized religions, maybe they are doing a membership drive? Who knows...

The Episcopal Church has a great series of ads a few years ago. Here are a couple of the tag lines:

Jesus died to take away your sins, not your mind (picture of Jesus on the cross)

Whose birthday is it anyway? (under a large picture of Santa Claus)

With all due respect to TV ministries, have you ever seen a Sony that gave Holy Communion. (Picture of a TV with a clergy stole)

Without God it's a vicious circle. (A picture of the earth from space)

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The Episcopal Church has a great series of ads a few years ago. Here are a couple of the tag lines:

Jesus died to take away your sins, not your mind (picture of Jesus on the cross)

Whose birthday is it anyway? (under a large picture of Santa Claus)

With all due respect to TV ministries, have you ever seen a Sony that gave Holy Communion. (Picture of a TV with a clergy stole)

Without God it's a vicious circle. (A picture of the earth from space)

Those are cool. Many moons ago, my father (a graphic designer and identity creator) and some of his friends had a group called "Graphic Truth" that did that kind of stuff around Atlanta.

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:yes: We have an awesome UU Congregation here in Ogden Utah. I have attended a few times, but cannot do so on a regular basis due to my work schedule... If it weren't for my schedule I'd probably attend regularly.

Budog. B)

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Not sure how many of the previous posters/commentors are still around, but thought I'd look to resurrect this thread (pun intended). I'm a member (and current board member) of the First Unitarian Church of Omaha. I'm always looking to reach out and connect with other UUs and answer questions from the curious. I really love visiting other congregations when I travel to see what great things are happening in other parts, so if you're out there give a holler!

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Canʻt believe that I never noticed this thread when it first came out. Iʻm a UU, CLF member because I canʻt deal with real people in person. Maybe one day Iʻll go to a "live" UU service, there are two within striking distance of me, but CLF suits me very well.

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I'm really glad that CLF is around. I haven't spent a lot of time at CLF, but I've appreciated what I have seen and anticipate doing more so. A recent seminary grad from our congregation is interning with them now as part of her path to ordination. She recently asked me to participate in a video project for the upcoming Veteran's Day, but I had to pass due to timing. She promised to hit me up again for a video blog. I like the face-to-face, but depending on my next assignment, I may be reaching out to CLF more if there's not a church or fellowship nearby that fits.

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