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Glaisne

Brehon Law

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Very interesting, where did find this.

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Used to teach online classes about it. :lol:

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Used to teach online classes about it. :lol:

You may have to explain more to me sometime.

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I may have to explain more to me sometime.

You can do that. :lol:

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You can do that. :lol:

I edited that post.

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I edited that post.

Sneaky.....

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Sneaky.....

Yeah I know, Email me those links

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Hunger strikes.

When a person felt they were wronged, they would go plant themselves in front of the door of the offending person. Once the person acknowledged their error, the stroker would go back home. Some even sat until their death, such as the brave men who started on the blanket and ended up on hunger strike in Ireland. Was a form of non-violent protest.

Brehon is a very interesting study. :lol:

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Under Brehon Law women were equal to men with regard to education and property. After marriage, the woman was a partner with, and not the property of, her husband. She remained the sole owner of property that had been hers prior to marriage. Property jointly owned by her and her husband could not be sold without her approval and consent. A married woman retained the right to pursue a case at law as well as recover for debt in her own person. In certain cases of legal separation for good cause, the wife not only took with her all of the marriage portion and gifts, but an amount over and above that for damages.

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Under Brehon Law women were equal to men with regard to education and property. After marriage, the woman was a partner with, and not the property of, her husband. She remained the sole owner of property that had been hers prior to marriage. Property jointly owned by her and her husband could not be sold without her approval and consent. A married woman retained the right to pursue a case at law as well as recover for debt in her own person. In certain cases of legal separation for good cause, the wife not only took with her all of the marriage portion and gifts, but an amount over and above that for damages.

She obviously didn't live in PA.

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Yeah I know, Email me those links

Will do.

She obviously didn't live in PA.

:lol:

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These were important occasions which

brought together all strata of society. Participation in the

festivities was compulsory! (Not to enjoy the life you had been given was an

insult). Guests were seated according to rank. The "champion's portion"

was awarded to the warrior who showed the greatest courage. To hold a

good banquet was to gain much prestige. It was important to invite the

'aes dana' (people of the arts - bards, musicians, etc. ) Songs were

sung, legends retold, and clan genealogies recited. Also, at festivals,

settlements and judgements of legal cases were made, and handfasting

contracts signed. However, no enmity must exist, no debt must be

collected and no weapon must be lifted.

A way of life that survived for centuries in these isles is rapidly

being lost before a torrent of mass consumerism, and an individualistic

society, where 'dog eat dog' is the rule, and where the power of the

State is so great that it shapes your very thoughts and life-style. We

would like to think there is an alternative to all this, that the old

values of clan and family can still be followed. We have much to learn

from our Celtic ancestors, and keeping alive our culture and social

customs is one very important aspect of this.

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Deja Vu.

Sorry I corrected it.

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FAMILY - the extended family ('fine' or 'clann') was the basic social

unit, consisting of several generations of descendants from one

ancestor. When several families settled in a particular territory they

formed a 'tuath', ruled over by a chieftain or a petty king. There were

about 150 tuatha, or kingdoms, in ancient Ireland.

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HEARTH - The hearth was of central importance in Celtic society, and

its foundation was the contract of handfasting. Within the hearth the

woman's authority was absolute. The hearth was the centre of much

activity, where many traditional crafts were carried out; it also

provided warmth and nourishment, it was a gathering place for

storytelling and music, and it had to be an open place of hospitality to

all.

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HOSPITALITY - A very important aspect of Celtic life. Both the hosts

and the guests were expected to observe certain social customs.

THE HOSTS had to provide food, drink, a warm bed if possible, and entertainment. They had to give the very best they had; not to do so was a gross insult. Once the guests had partaken of the hearth's hospitality, the hosts were obliged to refrain from any violence or quarrelling with them, for the guests were under the protection of the dun from then on.

The guests would be expected to make an offering to the hearth of cakes, bread, wine etc. according to their ability. They must show respect to the hosts and not cause quarrels, fights or disruptions during their stay. They would normally be expected to sing a song, play a tune, or

tell a tale.

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I am a creature of the hearth. I want a great big kitchen with a big brick hearth and a fireplace. Women's domain? I think not. Mine. Good as place as any to commune with the Sidhe. Something with a comfortable overstuffed chair. I could rest my tired old bones there and the radiant warmth would feel oh so good.

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These are very interesting tidbits, Jim. I see the basis for many things my mother taught me about hospitality. "The guest gets the best, Turpin". It would be nice to compile all these in a sticky so they don't get lost in thread-dom.

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These are very interesting tidbits, Jim. I see the basis for many things my mother taught me about hospitality. "The guest gets the best, Turpin". It would be nice to compile all these in a sticky so they don't get lost in thread-dom.

How do I do that?

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Ask mods to sticky this.

Thanks, Dread!

Mods can you please sticky this.

That almost sounds dirty. Next behind door number three....

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It would be nice to compile all these in a sticky so they don't get lost in thread-dom.

:P

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